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AMBROSE LAVENDALE

lavendale_ambrose_nv_tsotc lavendale_ambrose_bk_ald hearsts_191605 lavendale_ambrose_nv_tir lavendale_ambrose_nv_tlf lavendale_ambrose_nv_tuf lavendale_ambrose_nv_tmomc lavendale_ambrose_nv_tit lavendale_ambrose_nv_tmwchetw
 
Full Name: Ambrose Lavendale
Nationality: American
Organization: American Intelligence
Occupation Agent

Creator: E. Phillips Oppenheim
Time Span: 1916 - 1920

ABOUT THE SERIES

Ambrose Lavendale is an agent with American Intelligence.

The year we meet and start following this young man's adventures is 1916. The Great War has been ongoing in Europe for just shy of two years. The United States has not yet entered the conflict and would not for another year but interest in Washington on the conflagration is tremendous. To that end, numerous individuals have been dispatched across the Atlantic to obtain intelligence on its behalf. One of those people is Lavendale.

When we first come into contact with Lavendale, he is described as "a tall, well-set-up young man, with a face rather grave for his years and a mouth a little over-firm". He is usually dressed to the nines, his clothing bespoke from an English tailor of excellent regard.

Regarding spotting a very beautiful woman in a restaurant, "Lavendale was neither susceptible nor imaginative. He considered himself a practical, hard-headed person, notwithstanding the fact that he had embraced what was for his country practically a new profession. Nevertheless, he was conscious of what almost amounted to a new interest in life as he studied, a little too eagerly, perhaps, the girl's features." The woman, whom Lavendale did not yet know, was Suzanne de Freyne, a young lady who will come to play a major role in not only Lavendale's professional life but in his personal one as well.

As for the impressive Miss de Freyne, it is said "she was dark, with hair brushed plainly back from a somewhat high and beautifully shaped forehead. Her complexion was pale, her eyes a deep shade of soft brown. Her eyebrows were almost Japanese, fine and silky yet intensely dark. Her mouth, even in repose, seemed full of curves. She appeared to be of medium height and she was undoubtedly graceful." Her importance to the adventures of Lavendale is explained by the fact that she is every bit as much an operative on behalf of French Intelligence as he is for America.

And Lavendale is definitely an operative, despite the use of the word 'diplomat' to describe him. Though he had been for many months attached to the embassies in France and Germany, he states clearly, "I have resigned from the Diplomatic Service of America, but I remain her one secret agent."

Good lines:

- "Everything in the world was impossible before it was done."

- Said to Lavendale by de Freyne shortly in their dealings, "you are in the kindergarten stage of your profession." Ouch!

- An admittance of Lavendale, "I hate prejudices, but I am full of them."

BOOKS

Number of Books:1
First Appearance:1920
Last Appearance:1920

1 Ambrose Lavendale, Diplomat Ambrose Lavendale, Diplomat
Written by E. Phillips Oppenheim
Copyright: 1920

Collection of the ten short stories of adventures of Ambrose Lavendale:
The Man Who Could Have Ended The War
The Lost Formula
A Deal With Niko
General Matravers Repays
Susceptible Mr. Kessner
The Machinations of Mr. Courlander
The Indiscreet Traveler
The Undeniable Force
The Interrupted Revue
The Sentence of the Court
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NOVELLAS AND SHORT STORIES

Number of Stories:10
First Appearance:1916
Last Appearance:1916

1 The Man Who Could Have Ended The War The Man Who Could Have Ended The War
Written by E. Phillips Oppenheim
Copyright: 1916

Published in Hearst's Magazine, Feb 1916 and then in Nash's Pall Mall Magazine, Apr 1916. Collected in the book Ambrose Lavendale, Diplomat.
A small man with a decidedly nasty attitude towards the evils of war nevertheless tells Lavendale he has the means to bring an end to Great War. He shows his evidence via small pellets containing two drops of liquid of his invention. These unleash a very nasty and destructive short-term gas.

2 The Lost Formula The Lost Formula
Written by E. Phillips Oppenheim
Copyright: 1916

Published in Hearst's Magazine, Mar 1916 and then in Nash's Pall Mall Magazine, May 1916. Collected in the book Ambrose Lavendale, Diplomat.
Lavendale's interest in the noted playwright, Somers-Keyne, might not have extended beyond his appreciation for the man's theatrical productions except that de Freyne obviously had an interest. But how might the writer be connected with the missing formula of death?

3 A Deal With Niko A Deal With Niko
Written by E. Phillips Oppenheim
Copyright: 1916

Published in Hearst's Magazine, Apr 1916 and then in Nash's Pall Mall Magazine, Jul 1916. Collected in the book Ambrose Lavendale, Diplomat.
The small Japanese man calling himself Niko claimed to be a friend of Lavendale's valet, Perkins, and had come to call to take that servant's place while Perkins spent time in the hospital. Niko is far more than he seems and for Lavendale that will be both a good and a bad thing.

4 General Matravers Repays General Matravers Repays
Written by E. Phillips Oppenheim
Copyright: 1916

Published in Nash's Pall Mall Magazine, Jun 1916. No evidence it was published in Hearst's Magazine. Collected in the book Ambrose Lavendale, Diplomat.
[plot unknown]

5 Susceptible Mr. Kessner Susceptible Mr. Kessner
Written by E. Phillips Oppenheim
Copyright: 1916

Published in Hearst's Magazine, May 1916 and then in Nash's Pall Mall Magazine, Aug 1916. Collected in the book Ambrose Lavendale, Diplomat.
[plot unknown]

6 The Machinations of Mr. Courlander The Machinations of Mr. Courlander
Written by E. Phillips Oppenheim
Copyright: 1916

Published in Hearst's Magazine, Jun 1916 and then in Nash's Pall Mall Magazine, Sep 1916. Collected in the book Ambrose Lavendale, Diplomat.
[plot unknown]

7 The Indiscreet Traveler The Indiscreet Traveler
Written by E. Phillips Oppenheim
Copyright: 1916

Published in Hearst's Magazine, Jul 1916 and then in Nash's Pall Mall Magazine, Oct 1916. Collected in the book Ambrose Lavendale, Diplomat.
[plot unknown]

8 The Undeniable Force The Undeniable Force
Written by E. Phillips Oppenheim
Copyright: 1916

Published in Hearst's Magazine, Aug 1916 and then in Nash's Pall Mall Magazine, Nov 1916. Collected in the book Ambrose Lavendale, Diplomat.
[plot unknown]

9 The Interrupted Revue The Interrupted Revue
Written by E. Phillips Oppenheim
Copyright: 1916

Published in Hearst's Magazine, Sep 1916 and then in Nash's Pall Mall Magazine, Dec 1916. Collected in the book Ambrose Lavendale, Diplomat.
[plot unknown]

10 The Sentence of the Court The Sentence of the Court
Written by E. Phillips Oppenheim
Copyright: 1916

Published in Hearst's Magazine, Oct 1916 and then in Nash's Pall Mall Magazine, Feb 1917. Collected in the book Ambrose Lavendale, Diplomat.
[plot unknown]

MY COMMENTS

I have been a huge fan of E. Phillips Oppenheim since I read, back in the early 70s, his famous The Great Impersonation. I have read more than a few of his other excellent works over the years and enjoyed them. His novels were interesting and well written but it was, IMHO, with his short stories that he was most in his element.

Which is why I enjoyed this collect so much. It could be said that this was really one complete novel but since neither the author nor the publishers seem to feel that way, I am in agreement that this is a collection of loosely connected tales.

GRADE

My Grade: B

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